Tag Archives: chicken

chicken wings

chicken wings

I nipped (or popped) up to Iceland for some porridge oats. I know, I know, they’re much more expensive, but they are on the doorstep, and time is money and all that.

I also came home with two packs of 2 x pasties for £2,  two packs of sliced cheese (I like this for portion control) for £2, two packs of cold meat for £3, the aforementioned porridge, some milk, and a pack of chicken wings for £1.89.

We finished the last of a two week pot of lentil soup yesterday, so I thought the wings would be useful for stock. I roasted them off, just sprayed with a little olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper, and I was expecting to treat the cats; and then I read that they shouldn’t have cooked chicken bones, because they could splinter (the bones, not the cats. I think).  When they were cooked, I offered Bill one, while I watched carefully, but she was extremely prissy and I had to take the meat off the bones for her.

Three more have gone into the fridge for Pete to eat for lunch, and the rest are now in the slow cooker, being turned into chicken stock. I shall chop up swede, leek and carrots later, and those and some barley will make another soup. I might give the Tribe some of the slow-cooked chicken, but only if they’re nice to me. Fat chance.

Honestly, I used to think I couldn’t make soup, and bought books on how to do it, but it’s like most other cooking – just use what you have.

chicken pesto pasta

chicken pesto pasta

Here’s another 20 minute recipe (although, to be fair, I used cooked chicken – you’d need to allow a bit longer if you used raw; if you do, cook it off as the first stage).

Put some olive oil in a deep frying pan and heat it up (just low-medium is fine), chop up a courgette, add it to the pan.

Put a pan of water on to boil for the pasta; I used spaghetti for a change, but any pasta will do. Don’t forget to add it when the water is boiling 🙂

Chop an onion, ditto. And some garlic. Add them. Saute the veg gently in the oil. When all the veg are softened, add the chicken, and keep stirring. I added a little splash of white wine at this stage, but it’s not compulsory.

When the pasta is done, drain it, and add it to the veg, and add some pesto. I was cooking for two of us, with 150g of pasta, and I used three teaspoons or so. Stir it all together, dump in a bowl, scoff. Really nice for a hot summer evening, and very little time standing over a hot stove.

 

pasta with chicken, mushrooms and blue cheese

danishblue-150x150

We bought some chicken breasts from our fabulous butcher up t’road, wrapped them individually, and froze them. And then fetched one out at the weekend to make a stir fry and, readers, it was *huge*. Well, huge to us, because we don’t eat much meat. So we used half in the stir fry, and the other half was confined to the fridge for another day.

Regular readers will know that Tuesday night is pasta night, so last night I chopped up the remaining chicken into small pieces and fried it off in some olive oil. Added four wizened mushrooms, half a wrinkly red pepper, and a chopped onion (£1.80 for 4kgs from the Turkish shop). Added about 30g of Danish blue and stirred it round till it had melted, and a good grinding of black pepper.

Served over spaghetti – delicious.  It’s worth keeping a chunk of blue cheese in the fridge, as it livens up pasta sauces, and makes great cheese scones (although you get quite sticky making them).

chicken and coconut curry

I had a yen for a chicken curry at the weekend; we make (and eat) a lot of chicken and coriander, but I wanted something different, dammit. So I trundled up to the Jacksons at the top of t’rerd, and came home with two packs of mixed thighs and drumsticks for a fiver, which Pete manfully deskinned for me; it’s a horrible job, and my arthriticy fingers really don’t enjoy it. We put them on a roasting tray, seasoned, drizzled with a little olive oil, and bunged them in the oven while the pizza was cooking. (Well, browning chicken is a boring task, and the oven was on …)

So, there was lots of skinned and part cooked chicken on Sunday morning. Looking at us. I skimmed through various books, but nothing quite appealed, so we winged it, pretty much.

Into the big slow cooker went, variously:

two tablespoons each of  ground almonds and dessicated coconut,

two onions fried in some groundnut oil until they were just starting to catch

a paste of garlic and ginger, and a little water, fried off, then spices added: cumin, coriander, turmeric, chili, fenugreek, cardamon, black pepper, and a little salt. All fried down into a paste

a can of coconut milk, and about a third? a half? can of water

a bunch of coriander

And then we just left it alone for about 7 hours. It was really, really nice, except it lacked … something. Not sure what. We’re going to have some more tonight, with some saag aloo, to see if that helps.

That fiver’s worth of chicken made 10 portions, by the way. Plus £0.80 for the coriander, and £1.25 for coconut milk, and maybe another couple of quid’s worth of ingredients. Well under £1 per portion.

p.s. we always cook chicken pieces on the bone – the flavour is better, and the meat falls off when it’s cooked anyway.

 

a chicken pie

(I said it was a busy weekend).

The last of last weekend’s roast chicken was languishing in a bowl in the fridge, and the weather forecast was Not Nice. So we decided that A Pie was called for.

Due to the unexpected trip to Lakeland, I started the filling in the tiny slow cooker before I went out. In went two chopped rashers of back bacon, about 30g of finely diced chorizo (oh, chorizo, how I love thee), a chopped leek, and about half a punnet of tired chestnut mushrooms. A small glug of olive oil, a grate of black pepper, some fresh thyme, and I set it on low, and went to Beverley. I’m getting so much use out of that thing, I just love it. I want a medium slow cooker now, but I really don’t think I have anywhere to keep it 🙁

There was a gorgeous smell when we returned! Once the cake baking marathon was over, I transferred the mix to a deep frying pan, added the chicken and warmed it through. And then, while warding off the Senior Cats, I added about two or three tablespoons of plain flour and cooked that off, and then just enough milk to make a sauce. No idea how much, just until it was right.

Pete manfully rolled out the puff pastry (which came from the freezer – I’m not that daft), and we ate it with mashed swede and carrot, and very nice it was too. And we were so hungry I forgot to photograph it, but I will do so when we have reheated the other half for tomorrow’s supper.

a chicken pie and a raspberry cake

I’ve written before about everlasting chicken. We don’t throw any of it away, except the bones, and then only when they’ve been boiled up for soup. I sometimes put the last bits of the meat into a pie filling, and bung that in the freezer, and when we had a friend coming for supper the other night, I though a chickie! pie would be nice.

This one turned out to have leeks and mushrooms in it, and a mustardy sauce, and I used up a slab of frozen puff pastry too, so that was a result. There might, possibly, be some room in the freezer soon …

I made a variation on the blackberry cake that I did last week; cut the sugar down, replaced the vanilla with lemon juice, and the milk with plain yogurt (as it needed using up). It came out less light, but actually I think we liked it better. So here it is.

Raspberry cake

1 punnet raspberries

230g caster sugar
200g plain flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
4 eggs
2 teaspoons lemon juice*
200g marg or butter
about 2 tbsp plain yogurt

Grease and line a 22cm springform pan, put the raspberries in the bottom. Whizz all the other ingredients in a food processor, and pour on top of the fruit. Bake at 180c for 40-45 minutes.

chicken and ricotta

We had a chicken stir fry a couple of days ago; when I got the chicken out of the freezer, I discovered there were two breasts melded together. One went on the stir fry, and one was left.  On Sunday, I made a quick cheesecake, as the friend coming for supper had requested same. So there was a tub of ricotta, and half a lemon, left over from that.

Diced up the chicken, and fried it off in a very little olive oil. added three cloves of garlic, some sliced chestnut mushrooms, and a chopped red onion. Stirred it about for three minutes or so, then added the lemon juice, and a small slug of white wine from an open bottle in the fridge. We seem to be slightly overrun with white wine – no idea why, because we don’t buy or drink white.  I think people bring it, and then decide they like the red on offer better!

Put a lid on the pan, and let it simmer down while the fusilli cooked. At the end, stirred in about half a tub of ricotta and some torn basil leaves. 

About 210 calories, plus pasta. 

making good use …

Guinness soda bread

We held a small gathering here the other night, to celebrate a friend’s birthday. We cooked up a slow cooker’s worth of lemony chicken and coriander, and  a big pot of dhal to accompany it, and also for the vegans/veggies in the throng. We also served (bought) chapatis.

That recipe, incidentally, is a base – we use a lot more garlic, chillis and spices than that, and I’ve discovered that if you just sling the chicken in the slow cooker without browning it, it still works beautifully, and you save a lot of time and effort, and a lot of oil too! Makes it a very low calorie dish. Anyway, I digress.

I also made a chocolate, ginger and guinness bundt cake, which left most of a bottle of stout left over.

So this morning, I tipped the remainder of the coriander chicken sauce into the stock pot, added a few carrots, a courgette and an onion which had been minced in the Magimix, and two mugfuls of red lentils, and a nice pot of spicy soup is now bubbling away for lunch. To go with it, I used (most of) the rest of the stout to make a Guinness soda bread loaf, which is now baking in the Remoska.

Sadly, Pete declined to drink the rest of the stout – it was two days old, I know, but still. I poured it down the sink.

chicken fusion pie

As it’s a bank holiday weekend here, we decided to splash out on a Chickie! from the wonderful T L Norman on Princes Ave. Pe picked up a 5.5ln bird on Friday morning, and we roasted it on Saturday, with potatoes, and fennel and carrots from the veg box.

Yesterday, we had cold chickie!, and wondered what to have with it. I surveyed the contents of the fridge, which included a celeriac (of which I am not unduely fond), and an elderly sweet potato. A quick google brought forth this rather nice recipe for a celeriac and sweet potato puree, which Pete made, and it was lovely.

We didn’t eat all the puree, so in a rather courageous fusion recipe, we have made a pie filling out of cold chicken, the left over fennel and carrots, and the puree. It is about to be enrobed in puff pastry from the freezer (life really is too short to make puff pastry) and we shall consume it with some spring greens.

It smells OK …

The chicken carcase has gone into the freezer to make soup, and the rest of the cold meat is in a bowl in the fridge – it might be enfreezered too, as we are away next weekend, and have a lot of veg to eat up.

roast veg forever!

roast veg

We decided to christen the Remoska with roast veg, something I love but rarely manage to start in time to eat it at a reasonable time of night. Well, actually, we christened it with some potato scones – they worked beautifully, but I’m not sure that it’s not easier with a griddle pan on the hob.

Between us, we chopped two courgettes, half a butternut squash, a red onion, a red pepper and a couple of carrots. Bunged them in the Remoska with about 4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped, some dried chilli flakes, and some thyme from the garden. Tossed it all about in olive oil, took a deep breath and switched it on.  It cooked in about 50 minutes, and was totally lovely. So we’ll do *that* again.

While that was going on, I boiled up some chickpeas that had been soaking overnight and set them aside for today. There was about half the roast veg left, so this morning I seasoned a chicken breast with salt, pepper and cumin seeds, and quickly roasted it off in the small Remoska (no idea why I’ve never tried this before :). Then, today’s main meal was:

Remainder of the roast veg, chickpeas, cubed chicken breast, and a stir through of some Ras el Hanout. As always, I was unsure what to put in for some additional liquor, and then inspiration struck. I have a bad habit of buying chutneys, and never using them, so I bunged in a tablespoon each of apricot chutney, and tomato relish – it worked really well.

And there was another meal’s worth left, which I put in the freezer!